Located on the northern coast of Bora Bora sits five overwater bungalows, with four of them available for public booking. Three of these bungalows, titled Brando's Overwater Bungalow, Marlon's Over Water Hidaway and The Black Pearl, are all owned by the same couple, making it easy to book more than one at a time if you're interested. The fourth bungalow is owned by a different couple. All of them, however, are kid friendly, which helps to attract more families to the island.

Cook returned to Tahiti between 15 August and 1 September 1773, greeted by the chiefs Tai and Puhi, besides the young ari'i Vehiatua II and his stepfather Ti'itorea. Cook anchored in Vaitepiha Bay before returning to Point Venus where he met Tu, the paramount chief. Cook picked up two passengers from Tahiti during this trip, Porea and Ma'i, with Hitihiti later replacing Porea when Cook stopped at Raiatea. Cook took Hitihiti to Tahiti on 22 April, during his return leg. Then, Cook departed Tahiti on 14 May 1774.[11]:263–279,284,290,301–312
I must say….That Tahiti Nui Travel certainly took great care of me !!!! Everything they did for me……was most definitely…..”TOP NOTCH” !!!! I believe I mentioned how the Heiva seats were excellent as well !!! …..Plus, the Friday night buffet dinner…..didn’t end until probably 10.00pm……So, I was thrilled, when the waitress spoke to the buffet manager, and he took it upon himself to contact Tahiti Nui Travel to ask them to delay picking me up to take me to the airport a half hour, so that I could watch most of the Coco Hotahota’s group performance !!! How extraordinarily thoughtful, attentive, and professional !!! A perfect way to end my South Pacific journey !!!
Located on the northern coast of Bora Bora sits five overwater bungalows, with four of them available for public booking. Three of these bungalows, titled Brando's Overwater Bungalow, Marlon's Over Water Hidaway and The Black Pearl, are all owned by the same couple, making it easy to book more than one at a time if you're interested. The fourth bungalow is owned by a different couple. All of them, however, are kid friendly, which helps to attract more families to the island.
The Tahitians believed in the afterlife, a paradise called Rohutu-no'ano'a. When a Tahitian died, the barkcloth wrapped corpse was placed on a funeral bier, fare tupapa 'u, which was a raised canoe awning on posts surrounded by bamboo. Food for the gods was placed nearby to prevent them from eating the body, which would condemn the spirit to the underworld. Mourners would slash themselves with shark's teeth and the blood smeared on barkcloth placed nearby. Most importantly, the Chief Mourner, donned the parae, an elaborate costume composed of an iridescent mask made of four polished pearl shell discs. One disk was black signifying Po, the spirit world, while one was white, signifying Ao, the world of people. A crown of red feathers signified 'Oro. A curved wooden board, pautu, below the mask contained five polished pearl shells, which signified Hina, the moon goddess. Hanging below were more shells in rows, ahu-parau, signifying the Pleiades, considered to be the eyes of former chiefs. Finally, a ceremonial garment, tiputa, covered the body and was decorated with an apron of polished coconut shells, ahu-'aipu.[11]:151-152,177-179,308
Before the arrival of the Europeans the island was divided into different chiefdoms, very precise territories dominated by a single clan. These chiefdoms were linked to each other by allegiances based on the blood ties of their leaders and on their power in war. The most important clan on the island was the Teva,[9] whose territory extended from the peninsula in the south of Tahiti Nui. The Teva Clan was composed of the Teva i Uta (Teva of the Interior) and the Teva i Tai (Teva of the Sea), and was led by Amo and Purea.[10]
The Bora Bora Pearl Beach Resort & Spa is a 5-star resort hotel that offers stunning views of Bora Bora and its lagoon. It's located on a small islet that is a fast & free 5-minute boat ride to the main island, making it perhaps the best of both worlds, with privacy and seclusion, but also with the ability to get elsewhere on Bora Bora quickly if needed.
Tahitian cultures included an oral tradition that involved the mythology of gods, such as 'Oro and beliefs, as well as ancient traditions such as tattooing and navigation. The annual Heivā Festival in July is a celebration of traditional culture, dance, music and sports including a long distance race between the islands of French Polynesia, in modern outrigger canoes (va'a).
Huahine feels like one island, but in fact it's two, connected by a short bridge. Huahine Nui (Big Huahine), to the north, is home to the bustling little village of Fare and most of the main tourist and administrative facilities. Rugged and isolated Huahine Iti (Little Huahine), to the south, offers the islands’ best beaches, azure lagoons and a serene, get-away-from-it-all atmosphere.
Each of the four are very similar to each other, though The Black Pearl is more on the luxurious side than the other three. Each of the bungalows come with air conditioning (aside from Dream Holiday Bungalow), a private bathroom, kayaks and a full kitchen. When booking a stay here, you'll want to note that this isn't a typical resort and instead each bungalow is more like a vacation home, meaning you'll need to rent a car in order to reach a spa, the store and restaurants.
One of the smaller resorts found on the island of Bora Bora, the Oa Oa Lodge offers 3 overwater rooms in addition to 5 land based choices. Though these 3 overwater rooms are situated over the water, they are not completely found over a lagoon but rather still connected partly to the island. This means that the bungalow is half supported by land and half supported by a stilt structure. Because of this however, you'll find a lovely balcony view from each room. You'll also find a ceiling fan, a fridge and a private shower. Those who love a little in-room entertainment will delight in the flat screen TV, satellite channels and Wi-Fi.

Huahine is exceptionally green—perhaps with envy, since fewer travelers frequent her sandy shores and lush hillsides than her favored counterparts, Moorea and Bora Bora. For this reason, though, Huahine has retained the alluring essence and authenticity of early Polynesia. The locals pride themselves on preserving what they genuinely believe is the most picturesque island in Tahiti; and our clients who visit often find that Huahine becomes their favorite island, returning again and again to find the same landscape still unchanged over time.
The Mo'orea Ferry operates from Papeete and takes about 45 minutes to travel to Moorea. Other ferries are the Aremiti 5 and the Aremiti 7 and these two ferries sail to Moorea in about half an hour. There are also several ferries that transport people and goods throughout the islands. The Bora Bora cruiseline sails to Bora Bora about once a week. The main hub for these ferries is the Papeete Wharf.
I would like to thank you for the great assistance to our Group. The Group is very happy with their stay in French Polynesia and with the services that it had from Tahiti Nui Travel. The TC has commented to us that the wedding was perfect and surely one of the greatest moments in the trip. Thank you again and I hope we can strengthen our partnership.
During the same period about a thousand Chinese, mainly Cantonese, were recruited at the request of a plantation owner in Tahiti, William Stewart, to work on the great cotton plantation at Atimaono. When the enterprise resulted in bankruptcy in 1873, a few Chinese workers returned to their country, but a large number stayed in Tahiti and mixed with the population.
Around 1750, war broke out between Atehuru and Papara, forcing Te'e'eva, the daughter of the Papara chief, to flee to Raiatea. She then married Tamatoa I's eldest son, Ari'ima'o, from which their son Mau'a was born. When Borabora warriors, led by Puni, invaded Raiatea in 1763, both Mau'a and the Taputapuatea priest Tupaia, were forced to flee to Tahiti, where the new Papara chief Amo and his wife Purea gave them refuge. This led to the building of the Mahaiatea marae at Papara. However, the marriage of Amo and Purea, and their status as black leg ariori, ended with the birth of their son Teri'irere. Tupaia then became Purea's lover. Tupaia would eventually sail with Captain Cook on the Endeavor, while Mau'a would sail with Lt. Gayangos on Aguila.[11]:35–38,60–61,85,134,208,277
This emigration, across several hundred kilometres of ocean, was made possible by using outrigger canoes that were up to twenty or thirty meters long and could transport families as well as domestic animals. In 1769, for instance, James Cook mentions a great traditional ship (va'a) in Tahiti that was 33 m (108 ft) long, and could be propelled by sail or paddles.[7] In 2010, an expedition on a simple outrigger canoe with a sail retraced the route back from Tahiti to Asia.[8]
The Tahitians believed in the afterlife, a paradise called Rohutu-no'ano'a. When a Tahitian died, the barkcloth wrapped corpse was placed on a funeral bier, fare tupapa 'u, which was a raised canoe awning on posts surrounded by bamboo. Food for the gods was placed nearby to prevent them from eating the body, which would condemn the spirit to the underworld. Mourners would slash themselves with shark's teeth and the blood smeared on barkcloth placed nearby. Most importantly, the Chief Mourner, donned the parae, an elaborate costume composed of an iridescent mask made of four polished pearl shell discs. One disk was black signifying Po, the spirit world, while one was white, signifying Ao, the world of people. A crown of red feathers signified 'Oro. A curved wooden board, pautu, below the mask contained five polished pearl shells, which signified Hina, the moon goddess. Hanging below were more shells in rows, ahu-parau, signifying the Pleiades, considered to be the eyes of former chiefs. Finally, a ceremonial garment, tiputa, covered the body and was decorated with an apron of polished coconut shells, ahu-'aipu.[11]:151-152,177-179,308

Bora Bora (French: Bora-Bora, Tahitian: Pora Pora) is a 30.55 km2 (12 sq mi) island group in the Leeward group in the western part of the Society Islands of French Polynesia, an overseas collectivity of France in the Pacific Ocean. The main island, located about 230 kilometres (143 miles) northwest of Papeete, is surrounded by a lagoon and a barrier reef. In the center of the island are the remnants of an extinct volcano rising to two peaks, Mount Pahia and Mount Otemanu, the highest point at 727 metres (2,385 feet).
During his final visit, Cook returned Ma'i to Tahiti on 12 August 1777, after Ma'i's long visit in England. Cook also brought two Maori from Queen Charlotte Sound, Te Weherua and Koa. Cook first harboured in Vaitepiha Bay, where he visited Vehiatua II's funeral bier and the prefabricated Spanish mission house. Cook also met Vehiatua III, and inscribed on the back of the Spanish cross, Georgius tertius Rex Annis 1767, 69, 73, 74 & 77, as a counterpoint to Christus Vincit Carolus III imperat 1774 on the front. On 23 August, Cook sailed for Matavai Bay, where he met Tu, his father Teu, his mother Tetupaia, his brothers Ari'ipaea and Vaetua, and his sisters Ari'ipaea-vahine, Tetua-te-ahama'i, and Auo. Cook also observed a human sacrifice, ta'ata tapu, at the 'Utu-'ai-mahurau marae, and 49 skulls from previous victims.[11]:405,419–435
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